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Erratum | Open | Published:

Erratum to: On the reversibility of parasitism: adaptation to a free-living lifestyle via gene acquisitions in the diplomonad Trepomonas sp. PC1

The original article was published in BMC Biology 2016 14:62

Erratum

Unfortunately, the original version of this article [1] contained an error. In the Discussion section, the species name E. terrapinae should be E. moshkovskii in two occasions. The corrected paragraph of the Discussion section can be found below;

“Interestingly, RNR, an essential enzyme for life independent of a host, has been lost in the human parasite Entamoeba histolytica [21], whereas we identified homologs of RNR of bacterial origins in three divergent Entamoeba species (Fig. 4b), including E. moshkovskii, which is considered to be free-living [71]. This lineage might have adapted to a free-living lifestyle secondarily, similar to Trepomonas. If so, E. moshkovskii is expected to harbour more recently acquired genes associated with a free- living lifestyle. This prediction could be tested by comparative studies of Entamoeba genomes.”

Reference

  1. 1.

    Xu F, Jerlström-Hultqvist J, Kolisko M, et al. On the reversibility of parasitism: adaptation to a free-living lifestyle via gene acquisitions in the diplomonad Trepomonas sp. PC. BMC Biol. 2016;14:62. doi:10.1186/s12915-016-0284-z.

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Author information

Correspondence to Jan O. Andersson.

Additional information

The online version of the original article can be found under doi:10.1186/s12915-016-0284-z.

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